When Spinal Neuromodulation Meets Sensorimotor Rehabilitation : Lessons Learned From Animal Models to Regain Manual Dexterity After a Spinal Cord Injury

África Flores, Diego López-Santos, Guillermo García Alias

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículo de revisiónInvestigaciónrevisión exhaustiva

3 Citas (Scopus)

Resumen

Electrical neuromodulation has strongly hit the foundations of spinal cord injury and repair. Clinical and experimental studies have demonstrated the ability to neuromodulate and engage spinal cord circuits to recover volitional motor functions lost after the injury. Although the science and technology behind electrical neuromodulation has attracted much of the attention, it cannot be obviated that electrical stimulation must be applied concomitantly to sensorimotor rehabilitation, and one would be very difficult to understand without the other, as both need to be finely tuned to efficiently execute movements. The present review explores the difficulties faced by experimental and clinical neuroscientists when attempting to neuromodulate and rehabilitate manual dexterity in spinal cord injured subjects. From a translational point of view, we will describe the major rehabilitation interventions employed in animal research to promote recovery of forelimb motor function. On the other hand, we will outline some of the state-of-the-art findings when applying electrical neuromodulation to the spinal cord in animal models and human patients, highlighting how evidences from lumbar stimulation are paving the path to cervical neuromodulation.
Idioma originalInglés
PublicaciónFrontiers in Rehabilitation Sciences
Volumen2
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 2021

Huella

Profundice en los temas de investigación de 'When Spinal Neuromodulation Meets Sensorimotor Rehabilitation : Lessons Learned From Animal Models to Regain Manual Dexterity After a Spinal Cord Injury'. En conjunto forman una huella única.

Citar esto