Are vital neighbourhoods socially privileged? Exploring the spatial relationship between urban vitality and urban vulnerability

Irene Gómez-Varo*, Xavier Delclòs-Alió, Carme Miralles-Guasch, Oriol Marquet

*Autor correspondiente de este trabajo

Producción científica: Contribución a una revistaArtículoInvestigaciónrevisión exhaustiva

Resumen

The built environment plays a key role in everyday wellbeing, as well-designed and accessible environments help fulfil people’s daily needs and activities. Of special relevance is the urban vitality concept of Jane Jacobs, a core principle of local planning strategies worldwide, which is used as an indicator of street vibrancy and quality of life among city residents. However, the promotion of her ideas on dense, lively, and diverse neighbourhoods coexists with increasing urban inequalities. The present study aims to examine if, and how, vital places are related with different levels of social vulnerability. To do so, we use Exploratory Spatial Data Analysis (ESDA) of synthetic indicators of both vitality and vulnerability. Our results provide evidence of local associations between urban vitality and urban vulnerability, and identify four main scenarios that can be helpful for policy intervention. The findings of this study have the potential to guide urban planning strategies to promote vital environments while preventing situations of social vulnerability.
Idioma originalInglés
Número de páginas17
PublicaciónLocal Environment
DOI
EstadoPublicada - 5 mar 2024

Palabras clave

  • Barcelona; built environment; intra-urban inequalities; Jane Jacobs; spatial clustering

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