Who participates in conservation initiatives? Case studies in six rural communities of Mexico

María Elena Méndez-López, Eduardo García-Frapolli, Isabel Ruíz-Mallén, Luciana Porter-Bolland, María Consuelo Sánchez-González, Victoria Reyes-García

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous studies attempting to explain the factors that determine local participation in conservation initiatives have concluded that socio-political exclusion is the main barrier to being involved in such initiatives. Such studies have not differentiated between different types of conservation initiatives. In this paper, we contribute to the literature analyzing the socio-cultural correlates of participation, by differentiating between participation in three types of conservation schemes: protected areas, payment for environmental services, and community conservation. We use data obtained from six rural communities in Mexico, where different combinations of conservation schemes are found. Through linear regression analysis, we explore the relationship between participation and (1) the community of residence; (2) demographics; and (3) socioeconomic characteristics of individuals. Our results suggest that local participation in conservation strategies depends, to a large extent, on the socio-political context in which they are embedded and that the exclusion of women and young adults is clearly consistent.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1045-1064
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Environmental Planning and Management
Volume62
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 May 2019

Keywords

  • BARRIERS
  • BIODIVERSITY CONSERVATION
  • FOREST MANAGEMENT
  • GENDER
  • LOCAL-PARTICIPATION
  • MOTIVATIONS
  • Mexico
  • PAYMENTS
  • PRINCIPLES
  • PROTECTED AREAS
  • SERVICES
  • community conservation
  • conservation
  • participation
  • protected areas

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Who participates in conservation initiatives? Case studies in six rural communities of Mexico'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this