What Explains Wildlife Value Orientations? A Study among Central African Forest Dwellers

O. Rickenbach, V. Reyes-García, G. Moser, C. García

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016, Springer Science+Business Media New York. This study of values placed on wildlife by Bantu and Yaka Pygmy forest dwellers (n = 200) in Northern Congo identified and analyzed two wildlife value orientations - “anthropocentric” and “biocentric.” The former, strongly displayed across all segments of both societies, was likely motivated by heavy reliance on bushmeat and human–wildlife conflicts, and was linked to attitudes approving the killing of animals for human benefit. The “biocentric” orientation was more common among formally educated male respondents who do not hunt and positively linked to attitudes favoring conservation. Wildlife management strategies should consider including 1) sustainable local wildlife exploitation, 2) livelihood projects that provide a real alternative to hunting, and 3) human–wildlife conflict mitigation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-306
JournalHuman Ecology
Volume45
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2017

Keywords

  • Central African forest dwellers, northern Congo Brazzaville
  • Wildlife management
  • Wildlife value orientations

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