Vascular risk factors as independent predictors of neurocognitive impairments in patients with late-onset epilepsy who have small-vessel disease

Marc Turon, L. Abraira, S. Cazorla, E. Fonseca, Manuel Quintana, Manuel Toledo, Xavier Salas-Puig, Estevo Santamarina

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

    3 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2019 Elsevier Inc. Rationale: Late-onset epilepsy is often accompanied by underlying cerebrovascular disease and has been associated with neurocognitive deficits even dementia, but the interrelation between them remains unknown. In this study, we aimed to explore the contribution of vascular-related and epilepsy-related factors on neurocognitive outcomes in a sample of late-onset epilepsy with history of cerebral small vessel disease. Methods: In this retrospective cross-sectional study, a comprehensive neurocognitive assessment was performed in 25 patients aged > 60 years with one or more unprovoked seizures and history of small-vessel disease. Raw scores of cognitive tests were transformed in T-scores and were grouped in 6 cognitive domains. Regression models were performed to explore the contribution of vascular risk factors (diabetes mellitus, arterial hypertension, dyslipidemia, and smoking habit) and epilepsy-related factors (drug-resistance, number of antiepileptic drugs, age at epilepsy onset, and epileptic focus localization). Results: Diabetes (p = 0.03) and smoking habit (p = 0.05) were the best independent factors to predict attention performance; diabetes also predicted visual memory function (p = 0.02); gender was related to verbal memory performance (p = 0.04) and speed processing (p = 0.02). Age at onset predicted that executive function (p = 0.05); age (p = 0.01) and gender (p = 0.03) were the major contributors to language performance. Epilepsy-related variables did not predict any cognitive outcomes. Conclusions: Vascular risk factors and sociodemographic characteristics were the best predictors of cognitive outcomes in a sample of late-onset epilepsy with cerebral small-vessel disease. Epilepsy did not show influence on cognitive function. Longitudinal studies are necessary to clarify the relationship between vascular risk factors and epilepsy on progression of cognitive deterioration in patients with late-onset epilepsy. “This article is part of the Special Issue “Seizures & Stroke””
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number106443
    JournalEpilepsy and Behavior
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

    Keywords

    • Cognitive impairment
    • Dementia
    • Late-onset epilepsy
    • Small-vessel disease
    • Vascular risk factor

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