Twenty-two years' survival of metastatic gastrinoma evidenced recently by somatostatin-receptor-specific scintigraphy

Susan M. Webb, Joan Monés

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3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An 18-year-old male presented in 1979 with a gastrinoma of unknown primary origin. Massive upper-digestive haemorrhage led to total gastrectomy, at which histology evidenced liver metastases, confirmed 9 months later at reoperation for an intestinal occlusion. Postoperative morphological evidence of liver metastases was repeatedly negative using abdominal ultrasound and computerized tomography (CT) scans and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), but a recent somatostatin-receptor-specific scintigraphy (Octreoscan) was positive only in the liver area. Twenty-two years after diagnosis, the primary tumour has not been identified, the patient leads a normal life, and his circulating gastrin levels, although still elevated at 317-550 pg/ml (normal < 127 pg/ml), have fallen over recent years from > 1000 pg/ml. We discuss the relevance of the described prognostic factors. © 2002 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)333-336
JournalEuropean Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Apr 2002

Keywords

  • Gastrinoma
  • Metastases
  • Octreoscan
  • Somatostatin-receptor-specific scintigraphy
  • Survival

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