Tree density and site quality influence on Pinus halepensis Mill. reproductive characteristics after large fires

Daniel Moya, Josep M. Espelta, Iraima Verkaik, Francisco López-Serrano, Jorge De Las Heras

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    25 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In Spain, many Pinus halepensis Mill. forests have been seriously affected by significant forest fires in the past decade, in 1994 alone, more than 100 000 ha were burned in Eastern Spain. In order to study the reproductive characteristics of P. halepensis after forest fires, six locations were selected in four areas affected by serious fires in the summer of 1994, and the following different precipitation zones were studied: dry-subhumid, dry and semi-arid. Ten years after the fires, data relevant to the production of pine cones: serotinous (grey), mature (brown), immature (green) and opened cones, was collected from areas with natural post-fire regeneration. Various cone and seed characteristics, such as pine cone seed number and weight, and germination percentage, were measured. The results showed greater production of cones and strobili in high-density sites. The biggest cone sizes (volume) and seed number per cone were related to site quality (dry-subhumid precipitation zone). Also, viability and germination percentages were higher with better site quality, with significant differences in values for serotinous and non-serotinous cones. Despite these differences, the canopy seed bank was large enough to ensure regeneration in this area for this age stand. © INRA, EDP Sciences, 2007.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)649-656
    JournalAnnals of Forest Science
    Volume64
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2007

    Keywords

    • Canopy seed bank
    • Natural regeneration
    • Pinus halepensis
    • Serotiny

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