Thiabendazole resistance and mutations in the β-tubulin gene of Penicillium expansum strains isolated from apples and pears with blue mold decay

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Abstract

Penicillium expansum is the causal agent of blue mold rot, a postharvest decay of stored fruits. This fungus also produces the mycotoxins patulin and citrinin. Control of P. expansum still relies mainly on the use of fungicides such as thiabendazole. Since its introduction, resistant strains have been reported. The aim of this work was to investigate the thiabendazole resistance and mutations in the β-tubulin gene of P. expansum strains isolated from apples and pears with blue mold decay from Spain. A total of 71 strains of P. expansum were scored for resistance to thiabendazole and the β-tubulin gene was sequenced. Out of 71 strains, 37 were sensitive and 34 were resistant to thiabendazole. Regarding the β-tubulin gene sequence, 10 different genetic types were determined, with a 99.7-100% similarity. When the amino acid sequence was deduced, five different amino acid sequences were found. All except one of the sensitive strains lacked mutations in the region sequenced. Of the 34 resistant strains, only eight had mutations that involved the residues 198 and 240. All the strains with mutations at position 198 always corresponded to resistant isolates. However, a high percentage of resistant strains had no mutations in the region of the β-tubulin gene sequenced, and so other mechanisms may be involved in thiabendazole resistance. © 2009 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)189-195
JournalFEMS Microbiology Letters
Volume297
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2009

Keywords

  • β-tubulin
  • Apples
  • Blue mold decay
  • Pears
  • Penicillium expansum
  • Thiabendazole

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