The Transmission of Home Garden Knowledge: Safeguarding Biocultural Diversity and Enhancing Social–Ecological Resilience: Safeguarding Biocultural Diversity and Enhancing Social–Ecological Resilience

Laura Calvet-Mir, Carles Riu-Bosoms, Marc González-Puente, Isabel Ruiz-Mallén, Victoria Reyes-García, José Luis Molina

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015, Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC. The last decades have witnessed a growing research interest of local ecological knowledge (LEK), with some research focusing on its effective transmission for natural resource management. Here we contribute to this body of research by focusing on an understudied agroecosystem: home gardens in rural areas of developed countries. We characterize home garden knowledge in Vall de Gósol (Catalan Pyrenees) and analyze the modes of transmission of such knowledge to discuss how such mechanisms might affect home garden resilience. We identify a diverse local home garden knowledge, which is mainly transmitted from parents to child. Members of the parental generation other than the parents and individuals of the same generation were only important for the transmission of some specific knowledge. We conclude that home gardens are biocultural refugia in a world of decreasing complex local knowledge systems and that different cultural transmission modes confer diversity and enhance social–ecological resilience in those agroecosystems.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)556-571
Number of pages16
JournalSociety and Natural Resources
Volume29
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 May 2016

Keywords

  • Agroecosystems
  • cultural transmission
  • Europe
  • local ecological knowledge
  • social memory
  • traditional ecological knowledge

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