The role of perceived control in physiological reactivity: Self-efficacy and incentive value as regulators of cardiovascular adjustment

Antoni Sanz, Francisco Villamarı́n

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    22 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was to verify the influence of self-efficacy and incentive value on cardiovascular reactivity. Ninety-six subjects were randomly assigned to four experimental groups in each of which the self-efficacy (high or low) and incentive value (high or low) were modified in relation to a mental arithmetic task. Subjects were led to believe that failure in this behaviour would result in the appearance of an aversive stimulus. Heart rate, systolic and diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure and skin temperature were all recorded throughout task performance, and at two given moments prior to the task, in order to establish baseline values. Subjects with high self-efficacy experienced a smaller increase in heart rate and systolic pressure, a greater increase in diastolic pressure, greater reduction in skin temperature and a reduction in pulse pressure during task performance. The effects were moderated by the incentive value in such a way that the effects of self-efficacy on cardiovascular reactivity were stronger when the consequences of task failure were perceived as highly relevant (high incentive value). © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)219-246
    JournalBiological Psychology
    Volume56
    Issue number3
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2001

    Keywords

    • Blood pressure
    • Heart rate
    • Incentive value
    • Perceived control
    • Self-efficacy
    • Skin temperature

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