The role of cortisol and prolactin in the pathogenesis and clinical expression of psychotic disorders

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2018 Elsevier Ltd For many years, the study of the psychotic phenotpe and approach to treatment of schizophrenia has been focused on positive psychotic symptoms, although the functional outcome is more clearly associated with negative and cognitive symptoms. Recently, there has been a growing interest in identifying biomarkers associated with these symptoms at early stages of the illness, including the risk of psychosis in vulnerable individuals (at-risk mental states [ARMS]). In this paper, the role of cortisol and prolactin in the clinical expression of psychosis will be reviewed. In examination of the role of these hormones and the risk of developing a psychotic disorder in ARMS individuals, previous studies have suggested potential roles for both cortisol and prolactin. The study of cognitive abilities in recent-onset psychotic patients has suggested that affected cognitive domains differ depending upon the studied hormones: cortisol (processing speed, verbal and working memory) and prolactin (processing speed), with several studies suggesting that there are sex-differences in these associations. All of these results suggest that both cortisol and prolactin contribute to the pathogenesis and clinical expression of psychotic disorders.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)24-36
JournalPsychoneuroendocrinology
Volume102
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019

Keywords

  • Cognition
  • Cortisol
  • Inflammation
  • Prolactin
  • Psychosis

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The role of cortisol and prolactin in the pathogenesis and clinical expression of psychotic disorders'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this