The politics of school choice in two countries with large private-dependent sectors (Spain and Chile): Family strategies, collective action and lobbying

Xavier Rambla, Óscar Valiente, Carla Frías

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In many countries choice of school is an increasing concern for families and governments. In Spain and Chile, it is also associated with a long-standing political cleavage on the regulation of large sectors of private-dependent schools. This article analyses both the micro- and the macro-politics of choice in these two countries, where low-status 15-year-old students record a significant segregation. At the micro level, some evidence is provided that not only middle-class skilful choosers but also the political representatives of private-dependent schools manage to pursue their interests drawing on economic, social and cultural capital. At the macro level, evidence also shows that the lobbies defending privatedependent schools can use and maintain these power resources. However, in some episodes collective action is an effective power resource for those who campaign in favour of a stricter regulation of these schools, but its influence is much difficult to maintain for longer periods. © 2011 Taylor & Francis.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)431-447
JournalJournal of Education Policy
Volume26
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2011

Keywords

  • Class
  • Class conflict
  • Comparative education
  • Politics
  • School choice
  • Sociology

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