The persuasive rhetoric of a manifesto (1870): Ribot's promise of an “independent” psychological science

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd Here, I take a closer look at a manifesto in the history of psychology: the introduction to the book entitled “La psychologie anglaise contemporaine.” It was published in 1870 and written by the French psychologist and philosopher Théodule Ribot (1839–1916). First, I review the use of the label “manifesto” in the historiography of psychology. Then the aim, rhetoric, and arguments of Ribot's text are examined, as well as the intellectual atmosphere surrounding it. Through this research, I hope to contribute to a better understanding of the aims and some immediate reactions to Ribot's text. My analysis focuses on his understanding of psychology as “independent science.” Ribot's manifesto contains criticism of the prevalent philosophies of his time, namely eclectic spiritualism and the positivistic schools. Within this setting, Ribot tried to present his psychology as ideologically neutral, aiming at revealing “psychological facts.” My interpretation portrays Ribot's tone as optimistic, framed in terms of a promise and an invitation; I see his text as primarily an attempt to attract collaborators through a broadly defined scientific project. He envisaged an almost boundless field of empirical research, based on the promise of intellectual freedom and scientific progress.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)204-222
JournalCentaurus
Volume59
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2017

Keywords

  • British associacionist psychology
  • French philosophy
  • Historiography
  • History of psychology
  • Théodule Ribot

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'The persuasive rhetoric of a manifesto (1870): Ribot's promise of an “independent” psychological science'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this