The impact of specialist and generalist pre-dispersal seed predators on the reproductive output of a common and a rare Euphorbia species

Mário Boieiro, Carla Rego, Artur R.M. Serrano, Xavier Espadaler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Pre-dispersal seed predators can have a severe impact on the reproductive output of their hosts, which can translate into negative effects on population dynamics. Here we compared the losses due to specialist and generalist insect seed predators in two Euphorbia species, a rare (Euphorbia welwitschii) and a common one (Euphorbia characias). Pre-dispersal losses to specialist seed-wasps (Eurytoma jaltica) and generalist hemipterans (Cydnus aterrimus and Dicranocephalus agilis) were on average higher for the rare E. welwitschii than for its widespread congener. In both Euphorbia species, the variation in losses to specialist and generalist seed predators was not related with traits indicative of plant size, fecundity, or isolation. Nevertheless, the temporal variation in losses to seed-wasps seemed to be intimately associated with the magnitude of yearly variation in fruit production. The impact of seed-wasps and hemipterans on the reproductive output of both Euphorbia species was additive, though there was evidence for infochemical-mediated interference at the fruit level. The moderate levels of seed predation in E. welwitschii, together with the results from the comparative analysis with its widespread congener, suggest that insect seed predation is not a causal effect of plant rarity. © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-233
JournalActa Oecologica
Volume36
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2010

Keywords

  • Congeneric species
  • Plant rarity
  • Seed predation
  • Seed-feeding insects

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