The impact of Clostridium difficile infection on resource use and costs in hospitals in Spain and Italy: A matched cohort study

Angel Asensio, Stefano Di Bella, Andrea Lo Vecchio, Santiago Grau, Warren M. Hart, Beatriz Isidoro, Ricardo Scotto, Nicola Petrosillo, Maureen Watt, Jameel Nazir

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14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2015 The Authors. To assess the impact of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) on hospital resources and costs in Spain and Italy. Methods: CDI data were collected from institutions in Spain and Italy. Each patient was matched with two randomly selected uninfected controls in the same institution. Patient outcomes were assessed for the first and second episodes of CDI and for patients aged ≤65 and >65 years. The impact of CDI on hospital length of stay (LOS) was used to calculate CDI-attributable costs. A multivariate analysis using duration of stay as the continuous outcome variable assessed the independent effect of CDI on hospital costs and LOS. Results: LOS attributable to CDI ranged from 7.6-19.0 days in adults and was 5.0 days in children; the increases were greater in adults in Italy than in Spain. Attributable costs per adult patient ranged from €4396 in Madrid to €14023 in Rome, with the majority of the cost being due to hospitalization. For children, the total attributable cost was €3545/patient. Conclusions: These data show that the burden of CDI is considerable in Spain and Italy. Treatments that can reduce LOS, disease severity, and recurrence rates, as well as effective infection control measures to prevent transmission, have the potential to reduce the burden of CDI.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e31-e38
JournalInternational Journal of Infectious Diseases
Volume36
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2015

Keywords

  • CDI
  • Clostridium difficile infection
  • Cost burden
  • Hospital length of stay
  • Matched cohort analysis

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