The functioning of the Behavioral Activation and Inhibition Systems in bipolar I euthymic patients and its influence in subsequent episodes over an eighteen-month period

José Salavert, Xavier Caseras, Rafael Torrubia, Sandra Furest, Belén Arranz, Rosa Dueñas, Luis San

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

54 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In order to better understand individual vulnerabilities to bipolar I disorder, this study evaluates individual differences in Behavioral Activation and Inhibition Systems as possible markers of bipolar I disorder. BAS and BIS functioning was evaluated in 39 bipolar I euthymic patients and in 38 controls. Patients showed higher scores on the BAS scale; differences were not detected on the BIS scale. Eighteen months post-initial assessment, patients were re-grouped according to the presence and type of new episodes. Patients relapsing with a depressive episode showed lower scores on the BAS scale than patients suffering from a manic/hypomanic episode, and a tendency to score lower than patients still asymptomatic. Reported higher BAS functioning would reinforce the hypothesis of a trait vulnerability to present approach behaviors during euthymia associated with bipolar I disorder, not necessarily related to the proximity of a manic/hypomanic episode, and interestingly not detected when approaching a depressive episode, circumstance in which BAS functioning would be similar to controls. Results did not reveal a weaker BIS in patients, hypothesized to account for BAS instability in bipolar I disorder. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1323-1331
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume42
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2007

Keywords

  • BAS
  • Behavioral activation system
  • Behavioral inhibition system
  • Bipolar I disorder
  • BIS

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