The evolutionary history of Drosophila buzzatii. XXX. Mitochondrial DNA polymorphism in original and colonizing populations

María Susana Rossi, Eladio Barrio, Amparo Latorre, Jorge E. Quezada-Díaz, Esteban Hasson, Andrés Moya, Antonio Fontdevila

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26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Both original and colonizer populations of Drosophila buzzatii have been analyzed for mtDNA restriction polymorphisms. Most of the mtDNA nucleotide variation in original populations of NW Argentina can be explained by intrapopulation diversity and only a small fraction can be accounted for by between-population diversity. Similar results are obtained using either the estimated number of nucleotide substitutions per site or considering each restriction site as a locus. Colonizer populations of the Iberian Peninsula are monomorphic and show only the most common haplotype from the original populations. Under the infinite island model and assuming that populations are in equilibrium, fixation indices indicate enough gene flow to explain why the populations are not structured. Yet, the possibility exists that populations have not reached an equilibrium after a founder event at the end of the last Pleistocene glaciation. Tajima's test suggests that directional selection and/or a recent bottleneck could explain the present mtDNA differentiation. Considering the significant population structure found for the chromosomal and some allozyme polymorphisms, the among population uniformity for mtDNA variability argues in favor of the chromosomal and some allozyme polymorphisms being adaptive.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-323
JournalMolecular Biology and Evolution
Volume13
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1996

Keywords

  • colonization
  • Drosophila buzzatii
  • founder events
  • mtDNA polymorphism
  • population structure

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