The evolutionary history of drosophila buzzatii. Xxv. random mating in nature

Jorge E. Quezada-Díaz, Mauro Santos, Alfredo Ruiz, Antonio Fontdevila

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using allozymes as the genetic probe, data are presented which show that wild Drosophila buzzatii females and males engaged in copulation mate at random. Hence, putative inbreeding due to local mating of genetically related flies emerging from the patchy distributed substrates, was not detected. We conclude that individuals raised from a niche disperse and mate at random with other members of the population, so only one round of drift due to the colonization of suitable and ephemeral breeding sites is taking place. © 1992 The Genetical Society of Great Britain.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)373-379
JournalHeredity
Volume68
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1992

Keywords

  • Allozymes
  • Breeding sites
  • Cactophilic drosophila
  • Mating pattern
  • Natural population
  • Population structure

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