The coordination of skill supply and demand in the market model of skill formation: testing the assumptions for the case of Chile

Oscar Valiente*, Adrián Zancajo, Judith Jacovkis

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The importance of skill formation for young people and the challenges of youth unemployment and underemployment are at the forefront of global development agendas. However, there is still an open debate about the most adequate policy frameworks to tackle these societal challenges and, particularly, about the role that the state and the market should play in the coordination of skills supply and demand. Taking Chile as a case study, the paper analyses how the market model of skill formation is re-contextualised by practitioners and other stakeholders at the local level. Through a realist evaluation approach, the paper tests to what extent the underlying theoretical assumptions of the market model hold up when confronted with the reality of the contexts in which young people, education providers and employers make decisions. The case of Chile is particularly interesting for the comparative literature because of its extreme neoliberal orientation and the centrality of the market in the allocation of resources and opportunities among different social groups. The findings show the limitations of the market for coordinating the supply and demand of skills and its negative consequences on the educational and work prospects of young people, especially the most disadvantaged.

Original languageAmerican English
Pages (from-to)90-103
Number of pages14
JournalInternational Journal of Lifelong Education
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • international development
  • realist evaluation
  • Skill formation
  • skill mismatch
  • vocational education
  • youth transitions

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