The complex role of inflammasomes in the pathogenesis of Inflammatory Bowel Diseases - Lessons learned from experimental models

Mònica Aguilera, Trevor Darby, Silvia Melgar

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2014 Elsevier Ltd. Inflammasomes are a large family of multiprotein complexes recognizing pathogen-associated molecular pattern molecules (PAMPs) and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). This leads to caspase-1 activation, promoting the secretion of mature IL-1β, IL-18 and under certain conditions even induce pyroptosis. Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD) is associated with alterations in microbiota composition, inappropriate immune responses and genetic predisposition associated to bacterial sensing and autophagy. Besides their acknowledged role in mounting microbial induced host responses, a crucial role in maintenance of intestinal homeostasis was revealed in inflammasome deficient mice. Further, abnormal activation of these functions appears to contribute to the pathology of intestinal inflammation including IBD and colitis-associated cancer. Herein, the current literature implicating the inflammasomes, microbiota and IBD is comprehensively reviewed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)715-730
JournalCytokine and Growth Factor Reviews
Volume25
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Caspase-1
  • Colitis-associated cancer
  • IBD
  • Inflammasomes
  • Microbiota

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