Testing the reinforcement sensitivity theory in borderline personality disorder compared with major depression and healthy controls

Joaquim Soler, Daniel Vega, Matilde Elices, Albert Feliu-Soler, Àngel Soto, Ana Martín-Blanco, Josep Marco-Pallarés, Rafael Torrubia, Juan C. Pascual

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5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Links between the reinforcement sensitivity theory (RST) proposed by Gray and several mental disorders have been established in a number of studies. However, specifically in the field of personality disorders, there is a lack of evidence regarding clinical samples. The aim of the present study was to test the RST in subjects with borderline personality disorder (BPD, n=100), compared to subjects with major depression disorder (MDD, n=45) and healthy controls (HCs, n=100). Behavioral approach system (BAS) and behavioral inhibition system (BIS) were assessed using the sensitivity to punishment and sensitivity to reward questionnaire; in addition all participants completed the beck depression inventory. Individuals with BPD showed higher scores on BIS and BAS compared with both control groups. An interaction between BIS and BAS was not observed, suggesting that the joint subsystems hypothesis (JSH) is not applicable in the case of BPD. A logistic regression analysis indicated that scores in sensitivity to punishment and sensitivity to reward were able to predict almost an 80% of BPD cases. Findings suggest that BIS and BAS reactivity is related to BPD main psychopathology. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-46
JournalPersonality and Individual Differences
Volume61-62
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Behavioral approach system
  • Behavioral inhibition system
  • Borderline personality disorder
  • Joint subsystems hypothesis
  • Sensitivity to punishment
  • Sensitivity to reward

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