Territorial (dis)continuity dynamics between ceuta and morocco: Conflictual fortification vis-à-vis co-operative interaction at the eu border in africa

Xavier Ferrer-Gallardo

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    14 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This contribution examines the development of territorial dynamics on the Ceuta-Morocco border region in the context of the structural Spanish-Moroccan rebordering that followed Spain's EU entry. The evolution of border practice is canvassed through the confronting notions of territorial discontinuity and territorial continuity. Clearly, current territorial dynamics between Ceuta and Morocco are characterised by both the existence of conflictive geopolitical cross-border dialectics and the implementation of fortifying securitisation measures. However, simultaneously, the border region is also marked by intensifying patterns of cross-border interaction which are sourced in the rising potentialities of economic and urban cross-border co-operation. In this light, the paper seeks to map the present intertwining of these apparently disagreeing territorial trends. To conclude, the paper underlines the ongoing modification of relational power between Ceuta and Morocco. It depicts the strengthening of local cross-border co-operative practices as a potential tool to cope with persistent sovereignty disputes in the border region. © 2010 The Author. Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie © 2010 Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)24-38
    JournalTijdschrift Voor Economische en Sociale Geografie
    Volume102
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2011

    Keywords

    • Border
    • Ceuta
    • Co-operation
    • Conflict
    • Morocco
    • Territorial (dis)continuity

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