Technology and the changing family: A unified model of marriage, divorce, educational attainment, and married female labor-force participation

Jeremy Greenwood, Nezih Guner, Georgi Kocharkov, Cezar Santos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Marriage has declined since 1960, with the drop being more significant for noncollege-educated individuals versus college-educated ones. Divorce has increased, more so for the noncollege-educated. Additionally, positive assortative mating has risen. Income inequality among households has also widened. A unified model of marriage, divorce, educational attainment, and married female labor-force participation is developed and estimated to fit the postwar US data. Two underlying driving forces are considered: technological progress in the household sector and shifts in the wage structure. The analysis emphasizes the joint role that educational attainment, married female labor-force participation, and marital structure play in determining income inequality.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-41
JournalAmerican Economic Journal: Macroeconomics
Volume8
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

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