Student teachers’ perceptions and evidence of peer learning through co-teaching: improving attitudes and willingness towards co-teaching

David Duran*, Marta Flores, Teresa Ribas, Jesús Ribosa

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the increasing practice and evidence of its potential, co-teaching has not become a widespread practice in schools yet. Research shows the need of helping teachers become aware of co-teaching as a good mechanism for peer learning among teachers. This study focuses on the changes in student teachers’ attitudes to use co-teaching through their perceptions as a tool for their own learning. Opting for a mixed-methods sequential explanatory design, 82 student teachers were divided into two groups, one receiving only conceptual training and the other one having the possibility to experience co-teaching in schools. It was hypothesized that the second group would improve their attitudes to use co-teaching more than the first group. A qualitative study was carried out to explore (1) students’ learning perceptions, (2) learning episodes in the out-of-class joint activity and (3) comparison between (1) and (2). Results confirm the hypothesis and find evidence from learning episodes to support students’ perceptions but show that there is not a clear match between students’ perceptions and contents from the learning episodes. Research implications and limitations are discussed.

Original languageAmerican English
JournalEuropean Journal of Psychology of Education
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted in press - 2020

Keywords

  • Cooperating teachers
  • Educational psychology
  • Preservice teaching
  • Teacher collaboration

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