Stereotypes of intimate partner violence: Do sex and sexual orientation matter?

María Elena Meza-de-Luna, Leonor María Cantera, Josep María Blanch, Adriano Beiras

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

© 2016, Psicologia: Teoria e Pesquisa Jul-Set. This study analyzed stereotypes on intimate partner violence (IPV) of heterosexual and same-sex couples. The participants, 232 Mexican college students, evaluated physical and psychological IPV exerted by men and women with different sexual orientations. The data were analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. The results indicate that men evaluated women and gay men as having a similar IPV, while men's perceptions of IPV for these groups were higher than those of women. Women viewed heterosexual men as the most violent and evaluated the other groups with different degrees of IPV. Physical violence is regarded as natural in men, both gay and heterosexual. To conclude, the results suggest that IPV stereotypes are affected by the sex of the evaluators and by their sexual orientation. It is relevant to expand the scope of prevention programs.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-9
JournalPsicologia: Teoria e Pesquisa
Volume32
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016

Keywords

  • Female homosexuality
  • Intimate partner violence
  • Male female relations
  • Male homosexuality
  • Mexico
  • Stereotyped attitudes

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Stereotypes of intimate partner violence: Do sex and sexual orientation matter?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this