Spontaneous reperfusion enhances succinate concentration in peripheral blood from stemi patients but its levels does not correlate with myocardial infarct size or area at risk

José A Barrabés, Ignacio Ferreira-Gonzalez, Marta Consegal, Ignasi Barba, Bruno García del Blanco, Imanol Otaegui, Jose F Rodriguez-Palomares, Gerard Martí Balaguer, Bernat Serra-Vidal, Neus Bellera Gotarda, Manuel Ojeda-Ramos, Filipa Valente, Maria Ángeles Carmona, Elisabet Miró-Casas, Antonia Sambola, Rosa María Lidón, Jordi Bañeras, Cristina Rodríguez, Begoña Benito, Marisol Ruiz MeanaJavier Inserte Igual, Antonio Rodríguez-Sinovas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Succinate is enhanced during initial reperfusion in blood from the coronary sinus in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) patients and in pigs submitted to transient coronary occlusion. Succinate levels might have a prognostic value, as they may correlate with edema volume or myocardial infarct size. However, blood from the coronary sinus is not routinely obtained in the CathLab. As succinate might be also increased in peripheral blood, we aimed to investigate whether peripheral plasma concentrations of succinate and other metabolites obtained during coronary revascularization correlate with edema volume or infarct size in STEMI patients. Plasma samples were obtained from peripheral blood within the first 10 min of revascularization in 102 STEMI patients included in the COMBAT-MI trial (initial TIMI 1) and from 9 additional patients with restituted coronary blood flow (TIMI 2). Metabolite concentrations were analyzed by 1H-NMR. Succinate concentration averaged 0.069 ± 0.0073 mmol/L in patients with TIMI flow ≤ 1 and was significantly increased in those with TIMI 2 at admission (0.141 ± 0.058 mmol/L, p < 0.05). However, regression analysis did not detect any significant correlation between most metabolite concentrations and infarct size, extent of edema or other cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) variables. In conclusion, spontaneous reperfusion in TIMI 2 patients associates with enhanced succinate levels in peripheral blood, suggesting that succinate release increases overtime following reperfusion. However, early plasma levels of succinate and other metabolites obtained from peripheral blood does not correlate with the degree of irreversible injury or area at risk in STEMI patients, and cannot be considered as predictors of CMR variables. Trial registration: Registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT02404376) on 31/03/2015. EudraCT number: 2015-001000-58.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages7
JournalScientific Reports
Volume13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Apr 2023

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular biology
  • Diagnostic markers
  • Prognostic markers

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