Speed of response initiation in a time-to-contact discrimination task reflects the use of η

Joan López-Moliner, Claude Bonnet

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    21 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    Avoiding collisions and making interceptions seem to require an organism to estimate the time that will elapse before an object will arrive to the point of observation (time-to-contact). The most outstanding account for precise timing has been the tau hypothesis. However, recent studies demonstrate that tau is not the only source of information in judging time-to-contact. By measuring reaction time in a time-to-contact discrimination task, we show that the η function, which is a specific combination of optical size and rate of expansion, explains both accuracy and the observed RT pattern. The results conform to the hypothesis that the observers initiate the response when η reaches a response threshold value. © 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2419-2430
    JournalVision Research
    Volume42
    Issue number21
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2002

    Keywords

    • Motion in depth
    • Optical variables
    • Response threshold
    • Time-to-contact

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