Significant improvement in triglyceride levels after switching from ritonavir to cobicistat in suppressed HIV-1-infected subjects with dyslipidaemia

P. Echeverría, A. Bonjoch, J. Puig, A. Ornella, B. Clotet, E. Negredo

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11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2017 British HIV Association Objectives: Cobicistat seems to have a low rate of adverse events compared with ritonavir. Methods: This restrospective observational study to evaluated changes in lipid parameters and the percentage of subjects with dyslipidemia in virologically suppressed HIV-infected patients who were receiving a regimen containing darunavir/ritonavir and were then switched from ritonavir to cobicistat, carried out from December 2015 to May 2016, included 299 HIV-1-infected patients who were on stable antiretroviral treatment including darunavir/ritonavir (monotherapy, bitherapy or triple therapy for at least 6 months) and were then switched from ritonavir to cobicistat. Lipid parameters, as well as plasma HIV-1 RNA and CD4 cell counts, were recorded at baseline just before the switch, and 24 weeks after the switch. Patients were stratified according to the presence of hypercholesterolaemia [baseline total cholesterol > 200 mg/dL and/or low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol > 130 mg/dL] or hypertriglyceridaemia (baseline triglyceride levels > 200 mg/dL). Results: Two hundred and ninety-nine patients were enrolled in the study. Fifty-two per cent of the total study population showed dyslipidaemia at baseline. All patients maintained HIV-1 RNA ≤ 50 HIV-1 RNA copies/mL at week 24. No statistically significant changes were seen in CD4 T-cell count from baseline to week 24 [654 (298) to 643 (313) cells/μL; P = 0.173]. When patients were stratified according to the presence of hypercholesterolaemia at baseline (n = 124), significant changes were observed in total cholesterol (P < 0.001), LDL cholesterol (P = 0.047), high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (P = 0.002) and triglyceride levels (P = 0.025), and when they were stratified according to the presence of hypertriglyceridaemia at baseline (n = 64), changes from baseline to week 24 in triglyceride level were statistically significant [median (interquartile range) 352 (223, 389) mg/dL at baseline and 229 (131, 279) mg/dL at week 24; P < 0.001]. Conclusions: Cobicistat as a booster of darunavir in HIV-infected subjects had a beneficial effect on the lipid profile in patients with hypercholesterolaemia or hypertrigliceridaemia at baseline.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)782-786
JournalHIV Medicine
Volume18
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2017

Keywords

  • darunavir/cobicistat
  • darunavir/ritonavir
  • lipid profile
  • suppressed HIV-1-infected subjects

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