Short-term effects of inhaled nitric oxide and prone position in pulmonary and extrapulmonary acute respiratory distress syndrome

Gemma Rialp, Antoni J. Betbesé, Manuel Pérez-Márquez, Jordi Mancebo

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Abstract

Inhaled nitric oxide (NO) and prone position (PP) are frequently used in the treatment of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We compared the gas exchange and hemodynamic effects induced by the combination of NO inhalation and PP in patients with ARDS and analyzed whether or not pulmonary (Pu) and extrapulmonary (Epu) ARDS patients behave differently. Eight Pu and seven Epu ARDS patients were studied in four situations: supine position (SP); SP with NO inhalation at 5 ppm (SP + NO); PP; and PP with NO inhalation (PP + NO). In comparison with SP, NO inhalation and PP induced significant increases in PaO2/FlO2 (from 106 ± 58 in SP to 131 ± 69 mm Hg in SP + NO, p = 0.01, and to 184 ± 67 mm Hg in PP, p < 0.001). Pu and Epu ARDS showed a similar improvement in PaO2/FlO2 with PP. Only Pu ARDS patients showed a significant increase (p < 0.001) in oxygenation induced by NO inhalation from 81 ± 45 to 100 ± 50 mm Hg in SP, and from 146 ± 53 to 197 ± 98 mm Hg in PP. In conclusion, PP is associated with a marked improvement in oxygenation, irrespective of the causes of ARDS, and additive effects of NO inhalation are mainly seen in patients with Pu ARDS.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)243-249
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume164
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jul 2001

Keywords

  • Acute respiratory distress syndrome
  • Nitric oxide
  • Prone position

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