Sex bias in diagnostic delay in bronchiectasis: An analysis of the Spanish Historical Registry of Bronchiectasis

Rosa Mᵃ Girón, Javier de Gracia Roldán, Casilda Olveira, Montserrat Vendrell, Miguel Ángel Martínez-García, David de la Rosa, Luis Máiz, Julio Ancochea, Liliana Vázquez, Luis Borderías, Eva Polverino, Eva Martínez-Moragón, Olga Rajas, Joan B. Soriano

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2017, © The Author(s) 2017. Diagnostic delay is common in most respiratory diseases, particularly in bronchiectasis. However, sex bias in diagnostic delay has not been studied to date. Objective: Assessment of diagnostic delay in bronchiectasis by sex. Methods: The Spanish Historical Registry of Bronchiectasis recruited adults diagnosed with bronchiectasis from 2002 to 2011 in 36 centres in Spain. From a total of 2113 patients registered we studied 2099, of whom 1125 (53.6%) were women. Results: No differences were found for sex or age (61.0 ± 20.6, p = 0.88) or for localization of bronchiectasis (p = 0.31). Bronchiectasis of unknown aetiology and secondary to asthma, childhood infections and tuberculosis was more common in women (all ps < 0.05). More men than women were chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-related bronchiectasis and colonized by Haemophilus influenzae (p < 0.001 for both). Onset of symptoms was earlier in women. The diagnostic delay for women with bronchiectasis was 2.1 years more than for men (p = 0.001). Discussion: We recorded a substantial delay in the diagnosis of bronchiectasis. This delay was significantly longer in women than in men (>2 years). Independent factors associated with this sex bias were age at onset of symptoms, smoking history, daily expectoration and reduced lung function.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)360-369
JournalChronic Respiratory Disease
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2017

Keywords

  • Bronchiectasis
  • diagnostic delay
  • gender bias
  • gender gap
  • sex bias

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