Seroprevalence of six reproductive pathogens in European wild boar (Sus scrofa) from Spain: The effect on wild boar female reproductive performance

Francisco Ruiz-Fons, Joaquín Vicente, Dolo Vidal, Ursula Höfle, Diego Villanúa, Ceres Gauss, Joaquim Segalés, Sonia Almería, Vidal Montoro, Christian Gortázar

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109 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We studied the seroprevalence of six reproductive pathogens in Spanish hunter-harvested wild boar females. The sample was representative of the hunting harvest in the studied hunting estates. Mean antibody prevalences were: 60.6 ± 0.06% for Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV), 56.6 ± 0.09% for porcine parvovirus (PPV), 51.8 ± 0.06% for porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2), 29.7 ± 0.09% for Brucella spp. and 36.3 ± 0.1% for Toxoplasma gondii. We did not detect antibodies against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSv). ADV seroprevalence was associated with PPV and PCV2 seroprevalence in Spanish wild boar females. Ovulation rate in the studied wild boar females was 4.41 ± 0.16 (n = 120), mean litter size was 3.91 ± 0.16 (n = 82) and the partial resorption index 0.92 ± 0.17 (n = 66). Ovulation rate and litter size were statistically associated with age. T. gondii seroprevalence was negatively related to ovulation rate and partial resorption index. Wild boars from managed fenced estates had antibodies against more pathogens than wild boars from open estates. Potential relations between management of wild boar populations and exposure of individuals to different reproductive pathogens are discussed. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)731-743
JournalTheriogenology
Volume65
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2006

Keywords

  • Infectious diseases
  • Reproduction
  • Seroprevalence
  • Spain
  • Wild boar

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