Ritual practices and collective consumption of animal products at the Iron Age rural settlement of Mas Castellar de Pontós (Girona, Spain) (5th-4th centuries BC)

Lídia Colominas, Enriqueta Pons, Maria Saña

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Animals have played an important role in certain ceremonies or rites in the past. During such activities, animals may have been alive, dead or been used as raw material. The disposal of detritus from these practices can lead to the formation of faunal assemblages with a particular taxonomic and anatomic composition. At the Iron Age 'Mas Castellar de Pontós' site (Girona, Spain), associations of archaeological materials excavated from Pit feature FS362 were suggestive of deposits arising from collective ceremonial consumption. Analysis of the 1309 mammal remains recovered from this feature is used to determine the nature and dynamics of the ceremony. At the same time, the relationship of these faunal remains with the other archaeological materials recovered in the pit will allow light to be shed on the significance and importance of these ceremonies in the framework of the social and political relations that governed the life of the inhabitants of this settlement. © Association for Environmental Archaeology 2013.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154-164
JournalEnvironmental Archaeology
Volume18
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2013

Keywords

  • Animal remains
  • Ceremony collective
  • Iron age
  • Northeast of the Iberian Peninsula
  • Pit
  • Rural settlement

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