Risk of serious adverse events associated with biologic and nonbiologic psoriasis systemic therapy: Patients ineligible vs eligible for randomized controlled trials

Ignacio Garcia-Doval, Gregorio Carretero, Francisco Vanaclocha, Carlos Ferrandiz, Esteban Daudén, Jose Luis Sánchez-Carazo, Mercé Alsina, Enrique Herrera-Ceballos, Francisco José Gómez-García, Marta Ferrán, Jose Luis López-Estebaranz, Jose Manuel Hernanz, Isabel Belinchón-Romero, Jaime Vilar-Alejo, Raquel Rivera, Jose Manuel Carrascosa, Cristina Carazo

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Abstract

Objective: To describe the use of systemic therapy for psoriasis (biologic and nonbiologic [classic] drugs) in patients not adequately represented in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and the risk of serious adverse events (SAEs) in these patients. Design: A registry inception cohort was used. Setting: Thirteen dermatology departments in Spain participated. Patients: A consecutive sample of patients treated with biologics and a systematic sample of patients treated with classic systemic therapy were evaluated. A total of 1042 patients (2179 person-years) were included. Exposure: Inadequate representation in trials was defined as the presence of any of the following factors: elderly age (>70 years); type of psoriasis other than chronic plaque psoriasis; history of infection caused by hepatitis B, hepatitis C, or human immunodeficiency virus; history of cancer (excluding nonmelanoma skin cancer); and chronic renal or hepatic disease.Main Outcome Measures: Serious adverse events as defined by the International Conference on Harmonization were evaluated. Results: In all, 29.8% of patients receiving systemic therapy for psoriasis would not have been eligible for RCTs. These individuals had an increased risk of SAEs (incidence rate ratio, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.5-4.7). Patients exposed to biologics had an adjusted increased risk of SAEs (incidence rate ratio, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.1-4.8) that was similar in patients eligible and ineligible for RCTs. Conclusions: Patients ineligible for RCTs are an important proportion (30%) of those receiving systemic therapy for psoriasis. These patients have a higher risk of SAEs and should be closely monitored. Patients exposed to biologics (whether these patients are eligible for RCTs or ineligible) are susceptible to the same increase in risk of SAEs, but biologics add to a higher baseline risk in patients who are ineligible for RCTs. The risk-benefit ratio in ineligible patients receiving biologics might be different from the ratio in eligible patients. ©2012 American Medical Association. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)463-470
JournalArchives of Dermatology
Volume148
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2012

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