Renal angiomyolipoma bleeding in a patient with TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene syndrome after 17 years of renal replacement therapy

Mónica Furlano, Yaima Barreiro, Teresa Martí, Carme Facundo, César Ruiz-García, Iara DaSilva, Nadia Ayasreh, Cristina Cabrera-López, José Ballarín, Elisabet Ars, Roser Torra

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7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología We report the case of a 32-year-old male diagnosed with TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, presenting with tuberous sclerosis (TS) and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease simultaneously. He progressed to end-stage renal disease and received a kidney transplant at the age of 12. The native kidneys presented angiomyolipomas (AML), which are common benign tumours in patients with TS. Seventeen years after transplantation, he presented with abdominal pain, anaemia and a retroperitoneal haematoma, the latter caused by renal AML bleeding. Selective embolisation was performed. Our patient could have benefited from the administration of mTOR inhibitors at transplant. This therapy is immunosuppressive and reduces the size of benign tumours in TS as well as the risk of rupture and bleeding. This patient did not receive mTOR inhibitors at the time of the transplant because the relationship between mTOR inhibitors and TS was unknown at that time. This case confirms the persistent risk of renal AML bleeding for both transplanted patients and patients on dialysis. As a result, we would recommend routine check-ups of native kidneys and nephrectomy assessment.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)87-92
JournalNefrologia
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2017

Keywords

  • ADPKD
  • Angiomyolipoma
  • Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease
  • Contiguous gene syndrome
  • mTOR inhibitors
  • TSC2/PKD1
  • Tuberous sclerosis

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