Regional serotonin effect caused by tetanus intoxication in rat central nervous system

J. Aguilera, F. Gonzalez Sastre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The effect of tetanus toxin on the brain monoamine systems was examined by evaluating the level of norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin in the whole brain and in different regions of the rat central nervous system (CNS). Tetanus toxin caused an increase of the rat serotonin CNS levels but no changes in the levels of catecholamines were observed. The study of the regional distribution shows that the highest increase is found in the spinal cord (70%), Lippocampus (83%), striatum (59%) and hypothalamus (70%). It appears that the size of the increment is related to the amount of serotonin innervation in each particular region. In other areas it is less pronounced (mid-brain, thalamus and cortex) or not detected (cerebellum and pons-medulla).
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)91-94
JournalBiogenic Amines
Volume6
Issue number1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 1989

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