Rainwater harvesting for human consumption and livelihood improvement in rural Nepal: Benefits and risks

Laia Domènech, Han Heijnen, David Saurí

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Use of rooftop rainwater as a source of drinking water in developing countries is increasingHowever, scepticism about the potential of this source and the associated health risks is still prevalent among water plannersA free listing and a household survey among 120 households was conducted in the hills of Nepal to examine the performance of rainwater harvesting systemsUsers perceive few health risks and in contrast, reported a wide range of benefits, including health benefits associated with the consumption of rainwaterWater quality testing results generally demonstrate good water quality but confirm that appropriate operation and maintenance practices are critical to ensure the collection of good quality waterDeficiencies in technical design and construction, lack of awareness, no market for spare parts and the inability of vulnerable households to maintain the system pose a risk to the collection and storage of safe water and to the long-lasting performance of the systems. © 2012 The Authors. Water and Environment Journal © 2012 CIWEM.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)465-472
JournalWater and Environment Journal
Volume26
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2012

Keywords

  • Rainwater harvesting
  • Risk assessment
  • Water quality
  • Water supply

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