Radiofrequency echographic multi-spectrometry for the in-vivo assessment of bone strength: state of the art—outcomes of an expert consensus meeting organized by the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis, Osteoarthritis and Musculoskeletal Diseases (ESCEO)

Adolfo Diez-Perez, Maria Luisa Brandi, Nasser Al-Daghri, Jaime C. Branco, Olivier Bruyère, Loredana Cavalli, Cyrus Cooper, Bernard Cortet, Bess Dawson-Hughes, Hans Peter Dimai, Stefano Gonnelli, Peyman Hadji, Philippe Halbout, Jean Marc Kaufman, Andreas Kurth, Medea Locquet, Stefania Maggi, Radmila Matijevic, Jean Yves Reginster, René RizzoliThomas Thierry

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2019, The Author(s). Purpose: The purpose of this paper was to review the available approaches for bone strength assessment, osteoporosis diagnosis and fracture risk prediction, and to provide insights into radiofrequency echographic multi spectrometry (REMS), a non-ionizing axial skeleton technique. Methods: A working group convened by the European Society for Clinical and Economic Aspects of Osteoporosis and Osteoarthritis met to review the current image-based methods for bone strength assessment and fracture risk estimation, and to discuss the clinical perspectives of REMS. Results: Areal bone mineral density (BMD) measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is the consolidated indicator for osteoporosis diagnosis and fracture risk assessment. A more reliable fracture risk estimation would actually require an improved assessment of bone strength, integrating also bone quality information. Several different approaches have been proposed, including additional DXA-based parameters, quantitative computed tomography, and quantitative ultrasound. Although each of them showed a somewhat improved clinical performance, none satisfied all the requirements for a widespread routine employment, which was typically hindered by unclear clinical usefulness, radiation doses, limited accessibility, or inapplicability to spine and hip, therefore leaving several clinical needs still unmet. REMS is a clinically available technology for osteoporosis diagnosis and fracture risk assessment through the estimation of BMD on the axial skeleton reference sites. Its automatic processing of unfiltered ultrasound signals provides accurate BMD values in view of fracture risk assessment. Conclusions: New approaches for improved bone strength and fracture risk estimations are needed for a better management of osteoporotic patients. In this context, REMS represents a valuable approach for osteoporosis diagnosis and fracture risk prediction.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1375-1389
JournalAging clinical and experimental research
Volume31
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2019

Keywords

  • Bone strength assessment
  • Femoral neck
  • Fracture risk
  • Lumbar spine
  • Osteoporosis diagnosis
  • REMS
  • Ultrasound

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