Quantifying dry and wet deposition fluxes in two regions of contrasting African influence: The NE Iberian Peninsula and the Canary Islands

Sonia Castillo, Andrés Alastuey, Emilio Cuevas, Xavier Querol, Anna Avila

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    9 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    © 2017 by the authors. This study considers the role of distance to the African source on the amount of deposition. To this end, dry and wet deposition was measured at a site close to Africa (Santa Cruz de Tenerife in the Canary Islands, SCO) and at a distant site located in NE Spain (La Castanya, Montseny, MSY). Because of the important influence of African influence on the buildup of particles in the atmosphere, we specifically addressed the contribution of North African events (NAF events) compared to other provenances (no-NAF events) in the wet and dry pathways at the two sites. At the site close to Africa, most of the crustal-derived elements were deposited in the dry mode, with NAF events contributing more than no-NAF events. Marine elements, by contrast, were mostly deposited at this site in the wet form with a predominance of no-NAF events. At MSY, wet deposition of SO 4 -S, NO 3 -N and NH 4 -N during NAF events was higher than at the site close to Africa, either in the wet or dry mode. This fact suggests that mineral dust interacts with pollutants, the mineral surface being coated with ammonium, sulphate and nitrate ions as the dust plume encounters polluted air masses in its way from North Africa to theWestern Mediterranean. African dust may provide a mechanism of pollution scavenging and our results indicate that this removal is more effective in the wet mode at sites far away from the mineral source.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number86
    JournalATMOSPHERE
    Volume8
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 18 May 2017

    Keywords

    • African intrusions
    • Anthropogenic pollution
    • Dry deposition
    • Mineral dust
    • Particulate matter
    • Wet deposition

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