Proof of concept of a new autologous skin substitute for the treatment of deep wounds in dogs

L. Ramió-Lluch, S. Cerrato, P. Brazis, R. M. Rabanal, D. Fondevila, A. Puigdemont

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2017 Elsevier Ltd Autologous skin grafts are effective for the repair of large skin wounds, but the availability of large amounts of skin is often limited. Through bioengineering, several autologous skin substitutes have been developed for use in human clinical practice. However, few skin substitutes are available for use in animals. The aim of this study was to develop and assess an engineered autologous skin substitute for the treatment of deep wounds in veterinary medicine. Canine keratinocytes and fibroblasts were isolated after double enzyme digestion from 8 mm punch biopsies from four healthy Beagle dogs. Skin substitutes were constructed on a fibrin-based matrix and grafting capacity was assessed by xenografting in six athymic mice. Bioengineered autologous skin was assessed clinically in two dogs with large deep skin wounds. The canine skin construct was ready for use within 12–14 days after the initial biopsy specimens were obtained. Grafting capacity in this model was confirmed by successful grafting of the construct in athymic mice. In both dogs, grafts were established and permanent epithelialisation occurred. Histological studies confirmed successful grafting. This full thickness skin substitute developed for the management of large skin defects in dogs appears to be a safe and useful tool for clinical veterinary practice. Further studies are needed to validate its efficacy for the treatment of deep wounds.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)36-40
JournalVeterinary Journal
Volume230
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2017

Keywords

  • Autologous graft
  • Canine
  • Engineered skin
  • Nude mice
  • Wound healing

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