Professions and Working Conditions Associated With Community-Acquired Pneumonia

Jordi Almirall, Mateu Serra-Prat, Ignasi Bolíbar, Elisabet Palomera, Jordi Roig, Ramon Boixeda, Maria Bartolomé, Mari de la Torre, Olga Parra, Antoni Torres

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2014 SEPAR. Introduction: Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is not considered a professional disease, and the effect of different occupations and working conditions on susceptibility to CAP is unknown. The aim of this study is to determine whether different jobs and certain working conditions are risk factors for CAP. Methodology: Over a 1-year period, all radiologically confirmed cases of CAP (n = 1,336) and age- and sex-matched controls (n = 1,326) were enrolled in a population-based case-control study. A questionnaire on CAP risk factors, including work-related questions, was administered to all participants during an in-person interview. Results: The bivariate analysis showed that office work is a protective factor against CAP, while building work, contact with dust and sudden changes of temperature in the workplace were risk factors for CAP. The occupational factor disappeared when the multivariate analysis was adjusted for working conditions. Contact with dust (previous month) and sudden changes of temperature (previous 3 months) were risk factors for CAP, irrespective of the number of years spent working in these conditions, suggesting reversibility. Conclusion: Some recent working conditions such as exposure to dust and sudden changes of temperature in the workplace are risk factors for CAP. Both factors are reversible and preventable.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)627-631
JournalArchivos de Bronconeumologia
Volume51
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2015

Keywords

  • Community-acquired pneumonia
  • Dust
  • Job
  • Occupational exposure
  • Temperature

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Professions and Working Conditions Associated With Community-Acquired Pneumonia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this