Productive diversification and sustainable use of complex social-ecological systems: A comparative study of indigenous and settler communities in the Bolivian Amazon

Patrick Bottazzi, Victoria Reyes-García, David Crespo, Sarah Lan Marthez-Stiefel, Harry Soria Galvarro, Johanna Jacobi, Marcelo Clavijo, Stephan Rist

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Agricultural and forest productive diversification depends on multiple socioeconomic drivers-like knowledge, migration, productive capacity, and market-that shape productive strategies and influence their ecological impacts. Our comparison of indigenous and settlers allows a better understanding of how societies develop different diversification strategies in similar ecological contexts and how the related socioeconomic aspects of diversification are associated with land cover change. Our results suggest that although indigenous people cause less deforestation and diversify more, diversification is not a direct driver of deforestation reduction. A multidimensional approach linking sociocognitive, economic, and ecological patterns of diversification helps explain this contradiction. © 2014 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)137-164
JournalAgroecology and Sustainable Food Systems
Volume38
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Keywords

  • Biocultural diversity
  • Bolivian Amazon
  • Deforestation
  • Indigenous knowledge
  • Productive diversification

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