Prevalence of and risk factors for intraoperative gastroesophageal reflux and postanesthetic vomiting and diarrhea in dogs undergoing general anesthesia

Carlos Torrente, Isabel Vigueras, Edgar G. Manzanilla, Cecilia Villaverde, Laura Fresno, Bibiana Carvajal, Marina Fiñana, Cristina Costa-Farré

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2017 Objective: To determine the prevalence of intraoperative gastroesophageal reflux (GER) and postanesthetic vomiting and diarrhea, and to evaluate risk factors associated with these gastrointestinal disorders (GID) in dogs undergoing general anesthesia. Design: Prospective observational study. Setting: University teaching hospital. Animals: Two hundred thirty-seven client-owned dogs undergoing general inhalant anesthesia for diagnostic or surgical purposes. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Patient, surgical, and anesthetic variables, and postanesthetic treatments administered in the immediate postanesthesia period were evaluated in relation to GID using univariate and multivariate logistic regression analysis (P < 0.05). Seventy-nine of the 237 (33.4%) dogs developed GID during the perianesthetic period. The prevalences of GER, vomiting, and diarrhea were 17.3%, 5.5%, and 10.5%, respectively. Intraabdominal surgery (P = 0.016; odds ratio [OR] 2.82, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.21–6.62), changes in body position (P = 0.003; OR 3.17, 95% CI: 1.47–6.85), and length of anesthesia (P = 0.052; OR 1.006, 95% CI: 1.000–1.013) were associated with GER. Changes in the ventilation mode during surgery (P = 0.011; OR 6.54, 95% CI: 1.8–23.8), length of anesthesia (P = 0.024; OR 1.001, 95% CI: 1.001–1.020), and rescue synthetic colloid support due to hypotension (P = 0.005; OR 6.9, 95% CI: 1.82–26.3) were positively associated with postanesthetic vomiting. On the contrary, dogs that received acepromazine as premedication were significantly less likely (P < 0.019; OR 12.3, 95% CI: 1.52–100) to vomit. Finally, length of anesthesia, changes in body position, changes in ventilation mode, or hypoxemia during the procedure tended to increase the risk (univariate model) of diarrhea during the recovery phase. Conclusions: GID are common in dogs undergoing general anesthesia. Duration and characteristics of the procedure, anesthetic management, and changes in certain patient variables are significant risk factors for the presence of GID in the perioperative period.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)397-408
JournalJournal of Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2017

Keywords

  • gastrointestional signs
  • perioperative complications
  • surgery

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Prevalence of and risk factors for intraoperative gastroesophageal reflux and postanesthetic vomiting and diarrhea in dogs undergoing general anesthesia'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this