Presence and purpose of nonindigenous peoples on indigenous lands: A descriptive account from the Bolivian lowlands

Victoria Reyes-García, Juan Carlos Ledezma, Jaime Paneque-Gálvez, Martí Orta, Maximilien Gueze, Agustín Lobo, Daniel Guinart, Ana Catarina Luz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Integration into the market economy changes indigenous people's use of land and resources. We study one pathway leading to integration of indigenous peoples to the market economy: the entrance of nonindigenous peoples into lands inhabited by indigenous populations. We analyzed data from a survey (n = 779) in 87 Tsimane' villages, an Amazonian society. We assessed the entrance of traders, loggers, cattle ranchers, highland colonist farmers, and other nonindigenous peoples in villages settled in parks, forest concessions, indigenous territories, and private lands. Interactions were generally frequent, friendly, and had an economic basis. The Tsimane' expressed hostility to the entrance of highland colonist farmers. The entrance of nonindigenous peoples was associated with unregulated natural resource extraction. If conservationists want to gain the allegiance of Tsimane' on conservation efforts, they will have to present them with a better alternative than the current economic benefits generated by the presence of nonindigenous peoples on their lands. © 2012 Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)270-284
JournalSociety and Natural Resources
Volume25
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2012

Keywords

  • Bolivian Amazon
  • Encroachment
  • Indigenous territories
  • Territorial rights
  • Tsimane

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