Predictors of acute inefficacy and the radiofrequency energy time required for cavotricuspid isthmus-dependent atrial flutter ablation

Jordi Pérez-Rodon, Julian Rodriguez-García, Axel Sarrias-Merce, Nuria Rivas-Gandara, Ivo Roca-Luque, Jaume Francisco-Pascual, Alba Santos-Ortega, Gabriel Martín-Sánchez, Ignacio Ferreira-González, Jose Rodríguez-Palomares, Artur Evangelista-Masip, David García-Dorado, Àngel Moya-Mitjans

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1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2017, Springer Science+Business Media New York. Purpose: Although cavotricuspid isthmus-dependent atrial flutter (CTI-AFL) ablation is a highly efficacious treatment, a bidirectional CTI block cannot be achieved in some patients. In this study, we sought to determine the predictors of acute inefficacy of CTI-AFL ablation and the predictors of the radiofrequency (RF) energy time required to achieve a complete bidirectional CTI block. Methods: All consecutive patients who underwent stand-alone CTI-AFL ablation in our institution, except patients with congenital heart disease, were included in this retrospective study. Clinical, echocardiographic, and ablation data were collected from the Arrhythmia Unit and Imaging Unit databases and medical charts. Results: Three hundred and fifty-five patients, with a mean age 63 ± 12 years, were included. The ablation was acutely inefficacious in 30 patients (9%). Tricuspid regurgitation was the only independent predictor of acute inefficacy of CTI-AFL ablation (OR 3.161, 95% CI 1.084–9.220, p = 0.035) and was associated with a longer RF time required to achieve CTI bidirectional block (p = 0.031). Age was inversely correlated with the RF time required to achieve a bidirectional CTI block (r = −0.133, p = 0.025). A previous CTI RF ablation, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), the use of an irrigated catheter, and advanced age were the independent predictors for requiring less RF energy time to achieve a bidirectional CTI block. Conclusions: Tricuspid regurgitation is associated with less acute efficacy in CTI-AFL ablation. Prior CTI ablation, COPD, use of an irrigated catheter, and advanced age are independent predictors for needing less RF energy time to achieve a complete bidirectional CTI block.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83-91
JournalJournal of Interventional Cardiac Electrophysiology
Volume49
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2017

Keywords

  • Ablation
  • Cavotricuspid isthmus-dependent atrial flutter
  • Efficacy
  • Predictors
  • Radiofrequency time

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