Predictors for good therapeutic outcome and drop-out in technology assisted guided self-help in the treatment of bulimia nervosa and bulimia like phenotype

Gudrun Wagner, Eva Penelo, Gerald Nobis, Anna Mayrhofer, Christian Wanner, Johanna Schau, Marion Spitzer, Paulina Gwinner, Marie Louise Trofaier, Hartmut Imgart, Fernando Fernandez-Aranda, Andreas Karwautz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd and Eating Disorders Association. Objective: Technology assisted guided self-help has been proven to be effective in the treatment of bulimia nervosa (BN). The aim of this study was to determine predictors of good long-term outcome as well as drop-out, in order to identify patients for whom these interventions are most suitable. Methods: One hundred and fifty six patients with BN were assigned to either 7months internet-based guided self-help (INT-GSH) or to conventional guided bibliotherapy (BIB-GSH), both guided by e-mail support. Evaluations were taken at baseline, after 4, 7, and 18months. As potential predictors, psychiatric comorbidity, personality features, and eating disorder psychopathology were considered. Results: Higher motivation, lower frequency of binge eating, and lower body dissatisfaction at baseline predicted good outcome after the end of treatment. Lower frequency of binge eating predicted good outcome at long-term follow-up. Factors prediciting drop-out were higher depression and lower self-directedness at baseline. Conclusion: Technology assisted self-help can be recommended for patients with a high motivation to change, lower binge-eating frequency and lower depression scores.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)133-138
JournalEuropean Eating Disorders Review
Volume23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2015

Keywords

  • bulimia nervosa
  • outcome
  • treatment

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