Positive and negative spontaneous self-talk and performance in gymnastics: The role of contextual, personal and situational factors

Francisco J. Santos-Rosa, Carlos Montero-Carretero*, Luis Arturo Gómez-Landero, Miquel Torregrossa, Eduardo Cervelló

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to analyse whether contextual (perception of motivational climate and positive and negative spontaneous self-talk in sports), personal (positivity) and situational variables (positive and negative spontaneous self-talk employed in competition and precompetitive anxiety) predict performance in a competition of ensembles of rhythmic gymnastics. 258 female gymnasts between ages14 and 20 (M = 15.24, SD = 1.46) participated in the study, completing pre- and post-competition measures. The results of the path-analysis showed that both the task-involving climate and positivity predicted positive self-talk in sport. This predicted self-confidence which, in turn, positively predicted positive situational self-talk in competition. For its part, the perception of an ego-involving climate positively predicted the use of both negative and positive self-talk in sport. Negative self-talk in sports predicted negative situational self-talk in competition and somatic and cognitive anxiety. In turn, cognitive anxiety positively predicted negative situational self-talk. Finally, performance was positively predicted by positive situational self-talk and negatively by negative situational self-talk. These results explain the functioning of spontaneous self-talk at different levels of generality and its relationship with sports performance.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0265809
JournalPloS one
Volume17
Issue number3 March
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2022

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