Phase Transfer of Rhodium(II)-Based Metal-Organic Polyhedra Bearing Coordinatively Bound Cargo Enables Molecular Separation

Thais Grancha, Arnau Carné-Sánchez, Laura Hernández López, Jorge Albalad, Inhar Imaz, Judith Juanhuix, Daniel Maspoch Comamala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The transfer of nanoparticles between immiscible phases can be driven by externally triggered changes in their surface composition. Interestingly, phase transfers can enhance the processing of nanoparticles and enable their use as vehicles for transporting molecular cargo. Herein we report extension of such phase transfers to encompass porous metal-organic polyhedra (MOPs). We report that a hydroxyl-functionalized, cuboctahedral Rh(II)-based MOP can be transferred between immiscible phases by pH changes or by cation-exchange reactions. We demonstrate use of this MOP to transport coordinatively bound cargo between immiscible layers, including into solvents in which the cargo is insoluble. As proof-of-concept that our phase-transfer approach could be used in chemical separation, we employed Rh(II)-based MOPs to separate a challenging mixture of structurally similar cyclic aliphatic (tetrahydrothiophene) and aromatic (thiophene) compounds. We anticipate that transport of coordinatively bound molecules will open new avenues for molecular separation based on the relative coordination affinity that the molecules have for the Rh(II) sites of MOP.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18349-18355
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American Chemical Society
Volume141
Issue number45
DOIs
Publication statusAccepted in press - 2019

Keywords

  • Bound molecules
  • Cation exchange reactions
  • Chemical separation
  • Immiscible phasis
  • Metal-organic polyhedron
  • Molecular separation
  • Proof of concept
  • Tetrahydrothiophene

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