Pharmacogenetic study of the effects of raloxifene on negative symptoms of postmenopausal women with schizophrenia: A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

Javier Labad, Lourdes Martorell, Elena Huerta-Ramos, Jesús Cobo, Elisabet Vilella, Elena Rubio-Abadal, Gemma Garcia-Pares, Marta Creus, Cristian Núñez, Laura Ortega, Eva Miquel, Judith Usall

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13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP Several double-blind clinical trials have reported improvement in positive, negative and cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia with raloxifene, a selective receptor estrogen modulator. However, there are some inconsistencies in replicating findings between studies of different countries. The failure to replicate these findings may result from genetic factors that could explain some of the variability in the treatment response. However, pharmacogenetic studies exploring this topic in women with schizophrenia are lacking. We aimed to conduct an exploratory pharmacogenetic analysis of a double-blind, randomized, parallel, placebo-controlled study of 24 weeks’ duration of raloxifene aiming to improve negative symptoms in postmenopausal women with schizophrenia. Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were studied: rs9340799, rs2234693 and rs1801132 in the Estrogen Receptor 1 (ESR1) gene, and rs1042597 in the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase 1A8 (UGT1A8) gene. Sixty-five postmenopausal women with schizophrenia (DSM-IV) were randomized to either 60 mg/day adjunctive raloxifene (36 women) or adjunctive placebo (29 women). Psychopathological symptoms were assessed at baseline and at weeks 4, 12, and 24 with the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Of the four studied SNPs, the rs1042597 variant in the UGT1A8 gene was associated with a different treatment response in negative symptoms with raloxifene treatment, whereas the rs2234693 variant in the ESR1 gene was associated with a distinct response in general psychopathology. In conclusion, our study suggests that genetic variants in UGT1A8 and ESR1 genes modulate the treatment response to adding raloxifene to antipsychotic treatment in postmenopausal women with schizophrenia.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1683-1689
JournalEuropean Neuropsychopharmacology
Volume26
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016

Keywords

  • Genetics
  • Negative symptoms
  • Pharmacogenetics
  • Postmenopause
  • Raloxifene
  • Schizophrenia

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