Perceptions and self-reported competency related to testing, management and treatment of hepatitis C virus infection among physicians prescribing opioid agonist treatment: The C-SCOPE study

Jason Grebely, Martine Drolet, Chizoba Nwankwo, Martha Torrens, Andrej Kastelic, Stephan Walcher, Lorenzo Somaini, Emily Mulvihill, Jochen Ertl, Ryan Liebert, Alain H. Litwin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearch

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2018 Elsevier B.V. Background: This study evaluated competency related to HCV testing, management and treatment among physicians practicing in clinics offering opioid agonist treatment (OAT). Methods: C-SCOPE is a study consisting of a self-administered survey among physicians practicing at clinics providing OAT in Australia, Canada, Europe and USA between April-May 2017. A 7-point scale was used to measure < average competence (score >4 of 7) related to HCV testing, management and treatment. Results: Among 203 physicians (40% USA, 45% Europe, 14% Australia/Canada) 21% were addiction medicine specialists, 29% psychiatrists, and 70% were metro/urban [mean PWID managed, 51; years of experience, 11]. The majority perceived HCV testing (82%) and treatment (85%) among PWID as important. The minority reported < average competence with respect to regular screening (12%) and interpretation of HCV test results (14%), while greater proportions reported < average competence in advising patients about new HCV therapies (28%), knowledge of new treatments (37%), and treatment/management of HCV (40%). In adjusted analysis, factors independently associated with < average self-reported competency related to the ability to treat HCV and manage side effects included fewer years in medical practice, fewer numbers of patients treated for HCV infection in the past six months, not having obtained information on screening, diagnosing or treatment of HCV, not having attended any training on HCV in the past year, and not having read or consulted AASLD/IDSA, EASL or other guidelines for HCV. Conclusion: Physicians treating HCV infection among PWID attending OAT clinics recognized the importance of HCV testing and treatment. However, self-perceived competency related to HCV management and treatment was low, highlighting the importance of improved HCV education and training among physicians practicing in clinics offering OAT.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)29-38
JournalInternational Journal of Drug Policy
Volume63
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2019

Keywords

  • Addiction
  • HCV
  • Knowledge
  • OST
  • People who inject drugs
  • Survey

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