Peer Evaluation Can Reliably Measure Local Knowledge

Victoria Reyes-García, Isabel Díaz-Reviriego, Romain Duda, Álvaro Fernández-Llamazares, Sandrine Gallois, Maximilien Guèze, Lucentezza Napitupulu, Aili Pyhälä

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleResearchpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

© 2016, © The Author(s) 2016. We assess the consistency of measures of individual local ecological knowledge obtained through peer evaluation against three standard measures: identification tasks, structured questionnaires, and self-reported skills questionnaires. We collected ethnographic information among the Baka (Congo), the Punan (Borneo), and the Tsimane’ (Amazon) to design site-specific but comparable tasks to measure medicinal plant and hunting knowledge. Scores derived from peer ratings correlate with scores of identification tasks and self-reported skills questionnaires. The higher the number of people rating a subject, the larger the association. Associations were larger for the full sample than for subsamples with high and low rating scores. Peer evaluation can provide a more affordable method in terms of difficulty, time, and budget to study intracultural variation of knowledge, provided that researchers (1) do not aim to describe local knowledge; (2) select culturally recognized domains of knowledge; and (3) use a large and diverse (age, sex, and kinship) group of evaluators.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)345-362
JournalField Methods
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2016

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